Dating bianchi bicycle - Vintage Bicycle Parts at BicycleClassics.com


The size is inches. Condition is fair. There are two dents in the top tube. One is on top and looks like it is from some point impact. The other is below that and larger. I think it is likely is the same thing caused both dents. I don't know how a crash could create dents like that. Perhaps something fell on it instead. It has a amateur re-paint job that looks like it was brushed on. There is rust around the brazed on rear brake cable guides on the top tube. There could be other rust under the new paint elsewhere on the frame. It rides well. The frame appears straight and rides fine with no hands (although I don't ride well with no hands). The chain appears to skip slightly with each turn. My guess is the chain and rear deraileur might not be matched correctly creating too much slack in the chain. Also, the chain may be worn. It appears to have a replacement plate on the bottom of the bottom bracket that replaced the original derailleur cable guide. The pedals are missing the toe clips which would have originally come with the bike. Also, it looks like the edges on the pedals have been purposely bent perhaps to make it easier to ride with regular shoes. It came without a front tire. I put on a 700 x 32 tire on. That's quite wide for this bike, but I had gotten it on sale at REI a couple of years earlier. I only paid $25 for the bike on 7-22-09 from an ad on Craigslist. I picked it up from the seller's grandparents in the Fletcher Hills area of El Cajon, CA.

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Author: Daven ()Date: 02-22-2000 13:22¬†Among the many sorrows of 1995, America’s failure to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the arrival of the moped on its shores probably doesn’t rank very high. The oversight is, perhaps, even understandable. With their puny engines, fragile suspensions, and lumpy contours, mopeds were a paean to defensive driving, and as such, seem completely antithetical to what passes for a recreational vehicle today. Yet the moped was beloved. Twenty years ago, it was up there with hot tubs and Studio 54 on the top of the charts–a hallmark of its age. Since then, times have been tough. Even the recent 70s revivals have largely ignored the moped. Unresuscitated, unable to leap Travoltalike into our decade, the moped languishes in the dark recesses of the past, growing ever more obscure, fading like the leisure suit and Ben Gazzara. So quickly, before everyone who remembers the moped joins the Shah in the hereafter, indulge me, and to celebrate it. The semi-successful marriage of the motorcycle and the bicycle was first performed in gas-starved Europe at the end of WWII. Dubbed the moped (a contraction of the words motor and pedal), and basically unregulated, it flourished in the streets of Paris and Rome. The motors were very small (50 cc’s max) and of the simple two-stroke variety, so you had to mix the oil and gas yourself. But these spunky vehicles got ungodly mileage (between 100 and 200 miles per gallon). The pedals were used to help start the engine and to assist in hill climbing (although on some models, real hill climbing could be more easily accomplished by getting off the moped and walking). Those chic Europeans seemed to love them. But in America, mopeds were effectively barred by laws that classified them as motorcycles and demanded that they have foot brakes, turn signals, and various other features that they didn’t possess. We had to slake our thirst for this kind of machine with motor scooters and electric bikes. We probably didn’t even know we had such a thirst. Then in 1974, after a heavy industry lobby, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration relaxed the safety standards for mopeds. The great American moped markets were open. Laws varied from state to state, but basically, the . moped’s maximum speed was set between 20 and 30 miles an hour, and drivers were forbidden to enter major highways. Beyond that, the mid-70s moped laws were pretty lax. Many states didn’t require a license, insurance, or registration; some didn’t even set a minimum operating age–which was a blessing for eager-to-get-dating 15-year-olds. (The 30 mph top speed was somewhat elusive, since most models that could achieve that kind of speed tended to shake the fillings out of your teeth when they did it. Yes, these mopeds were slow, and their engines were meek.)


Dating bianchi bicycle

Dating bianchi bicycle



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